Find Your Moment

Finding my moment at Camp Nou in Barcelona, Spain (1995). Chanting "Barca!" with about 95,000 spectators this was probably the biggest cultural moment I've experienced. I also spoke in caveman Spanish to the man sitting next to me. I told him how excited I was to be at the game. “Me gusta fútbol de España mucho!“  Soon he shared his sunflower seeds with me.

Finding my moment at Camp Nou in Barcelona, Spain (1995). Chanting “Barca!” with about 95,000 spectators was probably the biggest cultural moment I’ve experienced.

Steph’s note: The following story snipets set in Morocco have not actually happened, since I’ve never been there. But, they could happen… This post is part of an entry to a contest sponsored by Expedia and the National Film Festival for Talented Youth (NFFTY) The prize means traveling to a specific destination to make a 2-3 minute film for Expedia’s “Find Yours” campaign. (By the way, you don’t need to vote on this!)  Ultimately, I’m hoping to…

FIND MY MOMENT IN MOROCCO

Finding my moment with my mom while we wait in head scarves to enter a Ukrainian Orthodox church in Kiev.

Finding my moment with my mom while we wait wearing head scarves to enter a Ukrainian Orthodox church in Kiev in 2006.

Working the Djellaba and Hijab 

Moroccan women definitely make the djellaba work — and, actually, so do the men. The traditional gown, which is similar to a kaftan, doesn’t flatter me, that’s for sure.

In the mirror of the Marrakech riad where I am staying, I look like I’m ready to be wheeled into the delivery room. However, I’ll be wearing the djellaba while exploring the medinas in Marrakech, Fez and Rabat. In addition to respecting the culture, it doesn’t hurt to blend in a bit more especially in Rabat, which is more conservative than the other Moroccan cities.

Amira, the wife of the owner of the riad, helps me fashion a scarf over my head into a hijab. The hijab, especially with sunglasses, makes me feel elegant, like a slightly more wrapped up Grace Kelly. I just need a convertible and some elbow length gloves. On a more serious note, by wearing traditional attire, I’m hoping to better understand a Muslim woman’s point of view. I will take a walk in her kaftan and hijab. If I can, I hope to talk to a few women, and I think, in traditional clothing, it will be easier to approach locals.

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